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Scientific Psychic
2012-10-26
 

Scientific Research in Washington DC

Andrew Carnegie founded the Carnegie Institution of Washington as an organization for scientific discovery in 1902. The organization changed its name in 2007 to the Carnegie Institution for Science to reflect the fact that scientists work not only in Washington, but in six scientific departments on the West and East Coasts of the United States. The Geophysical Laboratory and the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism are both located on a beautiful campus at 5241 Broad Branch Road, NW in Washington, D.C.

The Department of Terrestrial Magnetism was founded in 1904 to map the geomagnetic field of the Earth. This goal was accomplished by 1929, and the focus of the department's research shifted toward understanding the Earth and its place in the universe. Today, the department has an interdisciplinary team of geophysicists, geochemists, astronomers, astrophysicists, cosmochemists and planetary scientists.



Dr. Linda Elkins-Tanton is the director of the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism. Dr. Elkins-Tanton conducts research on the evolution of terrestrial planets, and the relationships between Earth and life on Earth. One of Dr. Elkins-Tanton's latest projects analyzed the relationships between large volcanic provinces and global extinction events, focusing on the gaseous emissions of sulfur, chlorine, and fluorine from the Siberian flood basalts and their possible contribution to the end-Permian extinction 251 million years ago. In the above photograph, Dr. Elkins-Tanton introduces a lecture on the use of pressure to make novel materials by Dr. Timothy A. Strobel of the Geophysical Laboratory.

Dr. Strobel answers questions after his presentation

The Geophysical Laboratory was founded in 1905 to examine the physics and chemistry of Earth's deep interior. The laboratory is a world-renowned center for the study of rock compositions. The laboratory's research in high-pressure and high-temperature physics has produced many scientific publications in both Earth and material sciences.

Dr. Russell J. Hemley is the director of the Geophysical Laboratory. His research program has expanded to include high-pressure experimental and theoretical studies in condensed matter physics, Earth and planetary science, and materials science.

The Geophysical Laboratory and the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism host a series of Neighborhood Lectures at 5251 Broad Branch Road, NW, Washington, DC 20015. The lectures are open to the public and provide information about the research programs. Light refreshments are served after the lectures. Click this link for more information about the Carnegie Institution for Science.

Learn about the Timeline of the Earth




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